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251 Baptized August 26, 1799, witnessed by parents. "Records of the Corporation of Zion in New Germantown in West Jersey Births and Baptisms."  John Gesner
 
252 Baptized September 17,1775, Irregular Reformed Dutch Church, Tappan, Rockland County, New York. Parents listed as Ysaac Gisner, Johanna Levedsjer. Witnesses were Jan Gisner and Femmitje Brouwnser. (Brower) John (Guion) Gesner
 
253 Baptized December 3, 1749, Tappan. Witnesses, Jan Ferdon and Brichje, his wife, in the name of Henry Ludlow and Mary, his wife.

John and his wife first lived at the northern edge of Nyack where John ran a pettiauger on the Hudson River. His boat was captured by the British Frigate "Brune" and he was taken to New York City with the boat where he was forced to run a ferry survice. This initated the rumor that he was a Tory, resulting in an investigation by the Committee of Safety, and as a result, he and his wife took refuge in Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

On returning to Rockland County after the cessation of hostilities, around 1797, they returned to Nyack where he started a boat-building business.

1800 Orange Town, Rockland County, New York Federal Census. John Gisner, one male under 10, one male 10 under 16, one male 16 under 26 and one male 45 and older; two females under 10, two females 10 under 16, and one female 45 and older.  
John Hendrick Gesner, Jr.
 
254 John, like his father, was a miller by trade, died at age 87 years, 1 month and 11 days. Like his father, a miller, he lived and died on his farm located about one and a half miles outside of the village of Tappan, not far from the state road and close to the New York-New Jersey state line.

Joh. Hin'r Gissenger, born Hackensack and Femmetje Brouwer, young people of Tappan, marriage banns published in the Lutheran Church, New York, New York, New York, 1744-5, the Sunday after Easter 1744 and two other days. "Holland Historical Society Year Book," 1903, p 21. "Marriage banns published in the Lutheran Church, New York, New York, 1744-5."

Sunday after Easter 1744 and two other days; at Hackensack, Joh. Hinr. Gissinger and Femmetje Brouwer, young people of Tappan were married. "Some Early Records of the Lutheran Church, New York" Rev. Justus Folkner.

Jan Gissenger and Femmetje Brouwer, his wife, witnessed the baptism of John Valentine, born March 28, 1773, son of Jacob Valentine and his wife, Grietje (Margaret) Banta, son of Jacob Valentine and Margaret Gesner.

June 1, 1745. John Genry Gesner purchased property from Henry Ludlow, one and one-half miles southeast of Tappan Village and close to the disputed New York-New Jersey line, now Rockleigh, New Jersey. John and Femitcha began and ended their married life in a house built to the west of Sneden Landing Road, located to the west of the brook to the west of the DuBois house, and about 200 yards southeast from the present James Gowdy house on Piermont Road. (Mary Gowdy, wife of James, was related to the Gesner family through her father, John Gisner Conklin, grandson of Elizabeth Gesner and Jacob Conklin.)

"It may not be improper to note here that our Father and Mother, John Henry Gesner and Famitcha Bower, wished to remain neutral in the War of the Revolution. He refused to sign the Association Articles, dreading the Consequences; was called a Tory, but truly he was a peacable man in every respect. Threatenments were made, and his sons grown up were all mmenaced to be taken to New England, and confined in dungeons (or mines). Violence was used in many places, and with many. Father Gesner, now about 52 or 53 years old, admonished his sons, Jacob, Isaac and the twins Henry and Abraham, to take opportunity & go to New York now in possession of the English. With some others, after Father admonished them to be good boys, they went off in an open small Pettiauger belonging to Sneded who went also from Snedens etc." "Nicholas Gesner Diaries, July 1834. ms. at Palisades Free Library, Palisades, New York.

New York gave them safe harbor, but they would never return to the old farm again. Isaac found work as a Taylor. Twins Hendrick and Abraham with Jacob, went to Staten Island where they cut wood. As members of the Kings Orange Rangers commanded by Col. Bayard, they served as guards at Powles Point and Hoboken. "South of the Mountains," Alice Monro Haagensen, Vol. 34, No.2, 1990.

August 3, 1796. John Gesner of Harrington Township, yeoman, conveyed to Nicholas Gesner of Orange Township, Orange County, New York, for 100 pounds, one rod, and six perches of land at a place commonly called Rockland, part of which is in Harrington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey and part of which is in Orange Township, Orange County, New York. Signed by John Gesner. No witnesses. Recorded December 30, 1805, Bergen County Land Deed Book X:30.

August 30, 1796. John Gesner of Harrington Township, yeoman, conveyed to Nicholas Gesner (his son), of Orange Township, Orange County, State of New York, for 300 pounds and other good considerations, 31 acres, 1 rod, 6 perches of land at the place commonly called Rockland in Harrington Township, beginning at a corner lot No. 1, adjoining land of Jacob Conklin (who married Elizabeth Gesner, daughter of John Henry Gesner. Signed by John Gesner. Witnessed by Peter Mabie and Petrus Haring. Recorded December 30, 1805, Bergen County, New Jersey Land Deed Book, X:20.

Also in 1796, John Gesner of Harrington deeded a large tract of land to his son-in-law Jacob Conklin, residident of Harrington Twp., Bergen County, New Jersey.

November 5, 1805. Thomas Ludlow of the City of New York, merchant, and Mary, his wife, conveyed to Nicholas Gesner, 13 3/4 acres, 10 rods, of land, being lot No. 23, for 420 pounds, 6 shillings and 3 pence, that was part of the estate of Henry Ludlow, merchant, formerly of the City of New York, bounded north by the division line between New Jersey and New York, east by lot No. 22, south by lot No. 25, west by land formerly sold by Henry Ludlow, deceased. Signed by Thomas Ludlow and Mary Ludlow. Witnessed by Thomas Chapman, Jr., and Daniel Van Reipen. Recorded December 30, 1805, Bergen County, New Jersey. Land Deed Book X:20.


 
John Henry Gesner
 
255 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
256 1790. On the list of the Rockland County, Militia as an ensign.
1811. Rockland County Regiment under Lieut. Col. Blauvelt.
1816. Appointed colonel of the 160th New York Regiment.

In 1793 Nicholas built a farmhouse at 95 Closter Road, Palisades, New York, almost on the state line between New Jersey and New York.

"Nicholas was an avid diarist who chronicaled life in Palisades and Rockland between 1829 and 1850. Nicholas was described primarily being a farmer. He devoted parts of his life efforts to subsistence production. In addition to his farming, Gesner served as surveyor, schoolteacher, a sometime lawyer for his neighbors and diarist of the events of the neighborhood. Nicholas was also a mechanic inventing an innovative loom for weaving double-faced Dutch blankes. In addition, Nicholas was also instrumental in constructing a Reformed Methodist Church (Gesner Hall) in Palisades at the south east corner of Closter and Oak Tree Roads, known as Gesner Corners. After his death, the Gesner Hall became first a parsonage for the ME Church, and later became a private home bfore burning down in 1885. In his youth Nicholas had been a boatbuilder."

"Frontier Elements in a Hudson River Village," Carl Nordstrom.
"Historic Houses of Palisades, New York", michel Rebic and Alice Gerard, 2001.
Refer to land deeds executed by his father, John Gesner.
"The Gesner Family of New York and Nova Scotia", Anthon Temple Gesner, 1912.
"Palisades and Snedens Landing" Alice Munro haagensen. 
Nicholas Gesner
 
257 Ship builder. Left no descendants. Nicholas Gesner, Jr.
 
258 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
259 Did not marry. Sarah Ann Gesner
 
260 died young. Twin Gesner
 
261 died young. Twin Gesner
 
262 William was a shoemaker. In 1812, listed as a Lieutenant in the 83rd New York Regiment.

1832. William Herbert bought the house of George Mann on the southwest corner of Oak Tree and Closter Roads, Palisades, New York, where they lived, and where he operated a cobbler shop.

Earlier in 1832 W. Herbert had suffered an accident that resulted in the loss of his leg. It was at that time his father wrote: "Wome years ago by a bank and large rock falling on him near Snedens Landing, and mortification, first the loss of his foot. Then the ankle off, and perhaps a year after by reason of not healing and intolerable misery increasing again, he was obliged to go down to New York in the first of the winter and had his leg taken off just below the knee. I Nichs Gesr, his father, was present. Dr. (Valentine) Mott, surgeon with 8 or 9 students present. "Nicholas Gesner Diary, June 19, 1832."

He came into a tract of former John Henry Gesner lands on both sides of Carterette (Piermont) Road between the properties of John Gesner Conklin on the north and Joseph Dubois to the south.

1850 Federal Census, Palisades, Rockland County, New York, p 403. William H. Gesner age 60, Pedler, Mary Ann, age 41, David S., age 23, Matilda, age 18, Herbert, age 17.

1860. Federal Census, Orangetown, Rockland County, New York, p 125. Herbert Gesner, age 69, shoemaker, ary Ann, age 61, at home, David, age 30, carpenter.
"Laid Out", Reginald McMahon: Carterette Road. from "Two Haring Houses of Rockleigh, New Jersey." mms. Bergen County Historical Society, 1973.  
William Herbert Gesner
 
263 William went to Tappantown at age 18 where he worked in the carpenter's trade. He helped tear down the old church and build a new one. Afterwards he went to New York City to work in the Sneden & Lawrence Ship Yard and helped to build "Steamboat Warren." "Wm. Gesner takes tool chest to N. Y. intending to work in Herbert Lawrence's yard." Jan. 6, 1843 where he worked until 1844.

October 28, 1844. William moved from New York to Fair Haven, Connecticut where he went into the ship building business as "Gesner & Baldwin". He built about 140 vessels of various sizes and classes, Sail, Steam and Motor weighing from 1 to 2500 tons. "G. P. Gesner, June 3, 1909."

"George Paton Gesner letter" to Winthrop S. Gilman: "Local Histgory', Palisades Free Library. 
William Nicholas Gesner
 
264 Benjamin Gildersleeve left a will dated November 28, 1781, proven May 8, 1674, Rumbout Precinct, Dutchess County, New York in which he named his sons, James, Joseph, Elkanah, Benjamin, and Thomas. His only daughter was not named having predeceased the writing of his will in 1781. Executrix was Benjamin's wife, Hannah, and executor, his son, Nathaniel Gildersleeve. (Probably a cousin or nephew) The will was witnessed by Matthias Valentine and Francis Hashbrook, yeoman of Rumbout Precinct.  Benjamin Gildersleeve
 
265 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
266 Peter was baptized April 9, 1758 Peter Goetchius
 
267 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
268 Edith died from breast cancer. Edith talented contralto voice. Edith Greenberg
 
269 "In the name of God, Amen, January 17, 1736. I Edward Griffin, of the Borough town of Westchester, yeoman, being sick. I leave to my granddaughter, Mary Barton, a negro woman named 'Lucy'. I leave to my daughter Mary Disbrow, 5 shillings, in full of all claim. I leave to my great grandson, Benjamin Barton, all the remainder of the money that shall arise from the sale of my lands, to be put at interest by his father, Elisha Barton, till he is of age. My executors are to sell all houses and lands, and movable estates. I make Elisha Barton sole executor. Witnessed by Ebenezer Haviland, William Thompson and William Forster. Proved December 1, 1742. "Abstracts of Wills," Vol. III, - 378, published by The New York Historical Society.  Edward Griffin
 
270 Will of Edward Griffin, Borrough Town of Westchester, yeoman, dated January 17, 1736, proved December 1, 1742. "I Edward Griffin, being sick. I leave to my grand-daughter, Mary Barton, a Negro woman named "Lucy." I leave to my daughter, Mary Disbrow, 5 shillings, in full of all claim. I leave to my great grand-son, Benjamin Barton, all the remainder of the money that shall arise from the sale of my lands, to be put at interest by his father, Elisha Barton, till he is of age. My executors are to sell all houses and lands and movable estate. I make Elisha Barton sole executor." Witnessed by Ebenezer Haviland, William Thompson, William Forster. "Abstracts of Wills," Vol. III, p 378, published by The New York Historical Society.  Mary Griffin
 
271 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
272 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
273 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
274 "In the name of God, Amen, the 28th October 1731. I Lewis Guyon, of East Chester, being sick and weak. I leave to my wife 2/3 of personal estate after payment of debts and funeral charges. I leave to my daughter Mary, wife of John Alberson, 18 pounds. To my daughter Leah, wife of Philip Pinkney, 20 pounds. To my daughter Esther, when of age, 50 pounds and to my daughters, Isabell, Margaret and Susanah, to each 30 pounds when of age. I leave to my wife Dinah, the use of all lands and houses in Eastchester, Westchester, and New Rochelle, so long as she remains my widow. After the death of my wife I leave to my eldest son, Lewis Guyon, all my lands in Eastchester and Westchester, except 3 acres of salt meadow lying at Hutchinson's in Eastchester. I leave to my son Daniel Guyon, all my lands in New Rochelle, and the 3 acres of salt meadow. I make my wife Dinah, and my brothers, Isaac and Hinman Guyon, executors." Witnessed by William Fowler, Joshua Tompkins, Roger Barton. Proved December 4, 1741. Louis Guion
 
275 Louis Guion was in New Rochelle in 1696, probably with his son Louis Guion. In the 1698 census he was age 43, his wife Tomaza, age 42, with three children. In 1701 he purchased with Zacharie Angevin and Andre Nodine, Jr., land from Jacob Leisler, Jr. Louis Guion
 
276 On December 6, 1654 Lubbert Guysbertsen (Gijsbertsz) was given a Dutch patent for 100 acres of land at Bergen Neck below Cabon Point, now Greenville area, site of New Jersey. He was killed during an Indian raid in New Jersey in September 1655; reportedly died between December 6, 1654 and May 1, 1656. Lubbert Gysbertsen
 
277 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
278 Will of Rev. John Hallock, Brookhaven, Suffolk County, New York, September 16, 1764, proved September 11, 1765. "Far advanced in years, I will and devise all my lands, houses, meadows and rights of land which I have in Brookhaven, to my executors to be sold, in best manner they can and turned into money. All my apparel to two sons, Edward and Samuel. To son Samuel and son-in-law Abraham Underhill, 200 pounds to pay for the land my son Edward bought of Jesse Hallock, on condition that my son Edward release and give up a piece of meadow for which I gave him in a deed of gift. To the children of my LAST deceased wife, Phebe, 100 pounds as follows: To her son-in-law John Haviland, 7 pounds which he oweth me, and the remainder which is 93 pounds. I will to the children of my LAST deceased wife Phebe, which she had by her SECOND husband, Abner Hunt. (Names of children not given.) Executors to take so much money as they think necessary, and put it at interest for my sister Abiel Hallock, so long as she shall live. After her decease, executors to put 50 pounds at interest for the support of my cousin Clement Willetts, during her life. After her death interest to go to poor amongst Friends belonging to monthly meeting at Wesbury. Executors to pay to Abraham Lawrence of Flushing 30 pounds that I have promised to pay for my son Edward, being what I suppose is yet due on 100 pounds. All the rest to daughters, Sarah Hunt and Abigail Powell, each 1/8. To children of my deceased daughter Hannah Satterly, 1/8. To the 3 children of my deceased son John Halloock, viz, Samuel, Daniel and Phebe. To my daughter Catharine Powell, 1/8. To the children of my deceased daughter Phebe Underhill, 1/8. To my son Samuel 1/8, and to my daughter Amy Underhill,1/8. Executors, Loving Friends, Richard Willetts of Jericho in Queens County, John Whitson, 2nd of Bethage, Thomas Purcell of Bethage. Witnessed by Samuel Willis, Benjamin Tyler and Daniel Jones. "Abstracts of Wills," Vol. VI, published by The New York Historical Society.

Note: I am not sure how the following will applies.

Will of Phebe Hunt, Borrough Town of Westchester, Westchester County, New York, widow, (date of will not given) proved December 9, 1772. Phebe devised the following: To Phebe "Halleck," Thomas Clapp and John Griffen, sons and daughters of my sister Dorcas, each 10 pounds. To Mary Cornell, daughter of my brother Josiah. To John, Daniel and Samuel "Halleck", sons of my sister Martha, each 10 pounds. To Alexander Young and Phebe Sutton, each 5 pounds. To Phebe Clapp, wife of John Clapp, my riding chair. To my BROTHER Josiah Quimby, 50 pounds. To children of my brother Ephraim Quimby, viz, Elizabeth, Mary, Daniel, Sarah, Samuel Philena and Ephraim 50 pounds. To Mary Oakley, wife of Gilbert Oakley, 20 pounds and a set of blue curtains and a blue bed quilt. To my brother Daniel Quimby, my cloak. To Phebe Quimby, daughter of my brother Aaron Quimby, one bed. To the Overseer of Friends meeting house in Westchester, 5 pounds towards repairing it. To Jacob Hunt Vail, son of Matthew Vail, 5 pounds. To Phebe, wife of Reuben Wright, 50 pounds and all my household goods. To Ann, wife of Matthew Vail, all my every day wearing apparel. All the rest of my estate I leave to Phebe, wife of Edward "Halleck" and Phebe, wife of John Clapp, Jr., and Martha, wife of Joseph Sutton, and Phebe wife of Reuben Wright. All the rest of my estate I leave to my brothers, Aaron and Moses Quimby and they shall pay to Jonothan Quimby 4 pounds yearly for his support. Executors, brother Aaron Quimby and nephew, Moses Quimby. Witnessed by Gilbert Oakley and Josiah Quimby. "Abstracts of Wills," Vol. VIII, p 85, published by The New York Historical Society.

Rev. John Hallock, according to his will, referred to his LAST wife Phebe "by her second husband, Abner Hunt." His will was proved 1764, at which time his LAST wife Phebe was deceased.  
Rev. John Hallock
 
279 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
280 Died at age 70 years, 3 months and 7 days. Harriet
 
281 Ref: "Haskin Bible Record with Explanatory Notes": Contributed by Lorenzo H. Knapp, 28 Monroe Place, Port Chester, New York, published in the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Volume 76, page 166-167-168.

"Benjamin F. Haskin was born in Sheffield, Mass, then went to Poughkeepsie, New York when a young man, where he entered a store as a clerk and became a partner; removing to New York City, he became largely connected with shipping interests and the owner of several vessels. He was a member of the firm of Haskin and Rhinelander, Exchange Office at 83 Nassau Street.

Ref: Gravestone Inscriptions, Haskin Plot, Spring Lake Avenue, Section 15, Woodlawn Cemetery, New York, Burial Records, Office of Woodlawn Cemetery.

Records of the Reformed Church of Fordham, in the Borough of Bronx, City of New York, formerly the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Fordham, in the town of West Farms, Westchester County, New York. Copy in the library of The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society. 
Benjamin F. Haskins
 
282 Henry Remsen Haskin was educated at St. Mary's College, Maryland. He enlisted in the War of 1812, served under Commodore Chauncey, and was wounded in the battle at Sackets Harbor. About 1828 he established a grocery business on Varick Street, New York City which he continued to operate until about the time of his death.
 
Henry Remsen Haskins
 
283 Baptized March 8, 1772 Daniel Haugewout
 
284 In 1800 Egbert was living at Northfield, Richmond County, New York. His household consisted of 3 males under 10, 1 male 25-45; 1 female 16-25. Egbert Haugewout
 
285 Baptized December 22, 1728. Witnesses were Jacobus Bakker and Rebecca Staats. Neeltje Haugewout
 
286 Witness, Neeltje Bakker, paternal grandmother.
.  
Nellie Haugewout
 
287 In 1800 Nicholas "Hogovout" was living at 310 Castletown, as was his brother, Wyant "Hogovout". His household consisted of 2 males under 10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male 25-45; 1 female 10-16, 1 female 25-45, and 1 female 45 plus. Nicholas Haugewout
 
288 Baptized June 24, 1752. Witnesses were Nicklaas Hagewout and Neeltje Hagewout.  Peter Haugewout
 
289 In 1800 Peter was living at Northfield, Richmond County, New York. His household consisted of 1 male under 10, 3 males 10-16, 1 male 25-45; 1 female under 10, 1 female 16-25. Peter Haugewout
 
290 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
291 Leffert Pieterse Haughwout was assessed in 1675, took the oath of allegiance in 1687, was constable of Flatbush in 1692, and again assessed in 1703.

Reportedly, Leffert Pieterse is the ancestor of the Lefferts family. Surnames of children have been variously Haughwout and Lefferts. Refer to "Lefferts-Haughwout Family, The Haughwout Branches" by Lefferd M. A. Haughwout. 
Leffert Pieterse Haughwout
 
292 Baptized October 10, 1720. Witnesses were Jacob Van Pelt and Aaltje Hagewout. Aaltje Haugwout
 
293 Abraham died at a young age. Abraham Haugwout
 
294 Baptized October 25, 1724 Catharina Haugwout
 
295 Also referred to as Catharine. Catrina Haugwout
 
296 Baptized February 25, 1721-22. Witnesses were Abraham Tailor and Harmptje Hagewout. Apparently paternal aunt and her husband. Dirckie was mentioned in her father's will and also her mother's will dated March 22, 1761.

Taylor and Skinner's map of Staten Island of 1781 shows the house of "M. Smith" on Derckje's share of one of her mother's farms. 
Derckje (Dorcas) Haugwout
 
297 Baptized May 4, 1714. Witnesses were "Pieter Haughwout, Senior (i. e. Pieter Pieterse Haughwout) and Tryntie Backer." Witnesses were the paternal grandfather of the child and the child's aunt-in-law's mother, as Tryntie Backer was the mother of Neeltje Bakker who was the wife of Pieter Haughwout, who in turn was a brother of Egbert Haughwout. There were no further children.  Dirckie Haugwout
 
298 Baptized September 16, 1726. Witnesses were Philip Merril and Elizabeth Bakker.

Edgert was named in his father's will. He was alive July 27, 1755 when he was a witness at the baptism of his niece, Grietje Haughwout. Edbert was named in his mother's will.

Joseph Christopher, Daniel Berbrantz and Egbert Haughwout's wife were executors to Egbert's will dated January 28, 1773, proved March 11, 1773, in which he left his entire estate to his wife, Nelly, and his children, Peter, Francis, Egbert, Eleanor, Elizabeth, wife of John Merrill and Ann, wife of Thomas Lisk. 
Egbert Haugwout
 
299 Egbert died before his father, leaving two sons Egbert Haugwout
 
300 Baptized March 14, 1731. Witnesses were Cornelius Van Santvoord and Anna Staats. Jacob Haugwout
 

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